Productionyear: 1969

THE NATIONAL REHABILITATION CENTER

Two years before Peter Watkins’ famous Punishment Park, director Penelope Spheeris takes the McCarran Act to its inevitable next step and shows us – via an early use of mockumentary – what the U.S. might be like if potential subversives were simply locked up en masse before they had a chance to subvert anything. Preserved by the Academy Film Archive.

 

Screened on 16 mm.

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FOR THE DAMAGED RIGHT EYE

Presented at the symposium Expose 1968 at the Sogetsu Art Center 2, this film juxtaposes images of student protests, popular television, 60s psychedelia, scenes from the Shinjuku gay scene, and graphic art in a captivating montage that reflects the chaotic ethos of its moment. Matsumoto saw a paradigmatic shift in the heady, heated, hopeful moment of simultaneous global uprisings of 1968, and staged his own by triggering the first Japanese film expanded to three projections. Designed to dismantle conventional aesthetic values, the film’s dual projection with a third laid over the centre of the two juxtaposed frames expands filmic space to stage an intense visual assault.

 

Screened on 3 x 16 mm.

 

 

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THE SUN’S GONNA SHINE

A lyrical recreation of Lightnin’ Hopkins’ decision at age eight to stop chopping cotton and start singing for a living. Musicologist Alan Lomax called Blank’s stunning and elegiac short on Hopkins’ reminiscences of his youth “one of the three most important films on the South.”

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BATH

Made in an environment and at a time when frequent and gratuitous images of nude women permeated the work of her male counterparts, director Penelope Spheeris produced this intimate and sensual observation of a woman bathing. The appearance of Spheeris’ credit at the beginning of the film seems to ask the question: how does voyeurism change when we know the voyeur is actually a voyeuse? Preserved by the Academy Film Archive.

 

Screened on 16 mm.

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MY NAME IS OONA

Nelson’s final breakthrough on the American avant-garde film scene. The sound consists of Nelson’s daughter, Oona, repeating the names of the days of the week and of her saying “my name is Oona”. The latter is edited into an expressive rhythmical structure that accompanies the visual structure of the film that plunges into the experience of a child.

 

Screened on 16 mm.

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KIRSA NICHOLINA

“In extremely graphic detail, we watch the birth, becoming so involved, we’re feeling the heat and tension. Kirsa Nicholina is a simple, poetic statement that is fantastically involving and moving.”
– Danny Weiss

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MONANGAMBEE

”Monangambee!” – Cry of the revolt in Angola. Spread from village to village, this cry made even the most brave men shiver. The cry translates as ‘white death’, and signified certain deportation with no return. The cry once accompanied the arrival of Portuguese slave traders and in the 1960’s it was used as an identifying sign and signal to gather for the People’s Liberation Front.

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